Kauri tree discovery stuns science world

Image courtesy of  Stuff.co.nz  https://www.stuff.co.nz/auckland/114534612/this-kauri-treestump-has-stunned-the-science-world-because-it-refused-to-die

New Zealand researchers have discovered Kauri trees can have a shared root system. AUT’s Dr Martin Bader and Associate Professor Sebastian Leuzinger were hiking in the bush and stumbled on a Kauri stump that was being kept alive by being connected to neighbouring trees trough it’s root system. This means we may have to consider a forest not as a collection of individual trees, but as a ‘super-organism“. This has implications for both the spread and control of Kauri die back disease. The disease caused by the organism Phytophthora agathidicida could theoretically spread through the roots from tree to tree. Also any control treatments such as injecting with phosphate could spread through a tree community reducing the cost of remedy treatments. Their paper is published in cell.com/iscience

This discovery reinforces what UBC Professor Suzanne Simard explains here –Trees communicate with each other!

Legionnaires Disease Health Warning

Legionnaires Disease Health Warning

New Zealand health authorities are warning gardeners to be aware that potting mix can cause a fatal disease called Legionnaires Disease if handled improperly.

The Legionnaires Disease warning comes after a coroner ruled that a Christchurch woman Margaret Valenski , who died on Boxing Day in 2011, was probably caused by Legionnaires Disease contracted after working with potting mix or compost. Canterbury medical officer of health Ramon Pink says “Enjoy your gardening by all means, but please make sure you avoid inhaling the dust from potting mix or compost as this can be dangerous.”

Legionnaires Disease is a type of pneumonia caused by bacteria. It is a potentially fatal, acute infectious respiratory process caused by any species of the aerobic bacteria belonging to the genus Legionella. It is not transmitted from one person to another person. The common transmission route for the disease is breathing in dust or water aerosols contaminated with the bacteria. Sources where temperatures allow the bacteria to thrive include cooling towers , hot-water tanks, and evaporative condensers of large air-conditioning systems, such as those commonly found in large office buildings and hotels.

The symptoms of Legionnaires Disease are a high fever, chills and a cough which may be dry or produce sputum. Some patients also have headache, muscle aches, tiredness, loss of appetite, loss of coordination (ataxia), and occasionally diarrhoea and vomiting. Impaired cognition and confusion and may also occur. So if you have these symptoms it’s best to go to see your doctor urgently.

In New Zealand in 2010 there were five related deaths and 136 hospitalisations caused by Legionnaires Disease related problems . There have been years where New Zealand has had seven or eight deaths. The death rates are normally higher if there has been no medical intervention.
The best ways to reduce the risk of infection with Legionnaires Disease for gardeners are to follow these steps when handling potting mix or compost:

  • Wear a respiratory face mask covering your mouth and nose.
  • Open potting bags gently using scissors rather than tearing them open, therefore increasing the air borne dust.
  • Work in a well ventilated outside area.
  • Dampen compost and soil with water to reduce air borne dust particles.
  • Wear gloves and thoroughly was hands after handling potting mix or doing gardening.

So anyone who has the symptoms listed above should see a GP urgently and tell them if they have been handling potting mix or compost recently.

Legionnaires Disease

Trees communicate with each other!

Trees communicate with each other.

Did you know that trees communicate with each other?

UBC Professor Suzanne Simard explains how trees are connected through their roots and can pass on nutrients to other plants of their species that need them. Watch this video for an explanation.

Seed Freedom

Seed Freedom
In New Zealand we need to defend our seed freedom from corporations that want to control our seeds for their profit at our expense. “At a time where mega corporations want to control our food, it is imperative that we stand together to protect our food, the planet and each other.” Vandana Shiva.

For more info go here –

http://www.navdanya.org/about-us/191-the-right-to-save-and-share-seeds-

The Rose of Jericho

The Rose of Jericho
Here’s an interesting time lapse video of the the Rose of Jericho.
The Rose of Jericho (Selaginella lepidophylla) is a species of moss that has adapted to the dessert environment. It has the amazing ability to ‘resurrect’ itself after periods of extreme dehydration lasting months or even years.
It just needs a few hours of exposure to moisture for the plant to sprout to life, unfurling from a small ball of dry leaves to an open green rosette.
This video is time- lapse taken by Videographer Sean Steininger after he exposed a number of plants to water.

Rose of Jericho from Sean Steininger

The One Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka

The One Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka

The One Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka
Masanobu Fukuoka was a very influential Japanese organic farmer who experimented and created his own practices that inspired many other organic growers that have advanced his principals.

If you are interested in organic growing The One Straw Revolution by Masanobu Fukuoka is one of the foundation books of the modern organic movement and well worth reading.

How Trees Get Water To Their Top Leaves

How Trees Get Water To Their Top Leaves

Ever wondered how a tree can get water tens of metres up to it’s top leaves? Well here’s the answer!

“Trees create immense negative pressures of 10’s of atmospheres by evaporating water from nanoscale pores, sucking water up 100m in a state where it should be boiling but can’t, because the perfect xylem tubes contain no air bubbles, just so that most of it can evaporate in the process of absorbing a couple molecules of carbon dioxide. Now I didn’t mention the cohesion of water (that it sticks to itself well) but this is implicit in the description of negative pressure, strong surface tension etc”.

Time Lapse Red Rose Blooming

Time Lapse Red Rose Blooming

Time Lapse Red Rose Blooming. 1:33
This time lapse video emphasises the beauty and majesty of a blooming rose in a way that’s difficult to notice normally in a garden.

Amorphophallus titanum flowers in Auckland

Amorphophallus titanum flowers in Auckland

An Amorphophallus titanum other wise known as the “corpse flower” has flowered for the first time ever in New Zealand, in the Auckland Winter garden. The giant flower smells like rotting flesh to attract insects for pollination. The Amorphophallus titanum has been growing in the Auckland Winter Garden for about seven years. It originates in the rainforests of Sumartra, where it’s inflorescence can reach over three metres in height. Also known as the titan arum because it has the largest unbranched inflorescence in the world. After the flower dies back, a single leaf will normally grow from the underground corm, that can reach the size of a small tree. The plant attracted a substantial number of visitors on a sunny Sunday afternoon, that made a queue that took about a half hours shuffle to see the flower. Corpse Flower, Titan Arum

Poisonous Castor Oil plant

Poisonous Castor Oil plant

The Castor Oil plant ( Ricinus communis ) can potentially kill an adult human after consuming just four to eight seeds. All parts of the plant are poisonous, but the seed have the highest concentration of poison. It contains some of the strongest toxins in the plant kingdom: the alkaloid ricinin as well as the toxalbumin ricin. These are more toxic than cyanide. It causes a painful death. Symptoms typically occur between 2-4 hours but can be delayed up to 36 hours. Symptoms include a burning sensation in the mouth, nausea, vomiting, stomach ache, diarrhea, headache, cold sweat, fever, disorientation, sleepiness, hypotension, tachycardia ( abnormally fast resting heart rate ), shortage of breath and seizures, followed by collapse and death. This is the plant that castor oil is made from. The toxins can be extracted through a complicated process, making commercially cold pressed castor oil safe to humans in normal doses, both internally and externally.
The castor oil plant is a fast growing perennial shrub that can reach around 12 metres tall. With glossy large palm-shaped leaves with 7-9 coarsely toothed segments, cluster-like blossoms and prickly fruits, that contain large oval, shiny, bean like poisonous seeds.
If you’ve got this plant in your garden I recommend removing it, by wearing rubber gloves, and chopping it down and digging out the roots, because as well as being poisonous it spreads to become a weed.

Poisonous Castor Oil plant

If you’ve got this in your garden I would recommend removing it.